Information Center

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Wild Hog Hunter Ponyboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    762
    Blog Entries
    3

    Hunting With Suppressors

    With Texas legalizing the use of suppressors for game animals this week we've seen a flurry of searches and questions about using suppressors for hunting. I threw together this article to try and spread some knowledge about suppressors, their use and how to buy your own. Let me know if yall have any questions about it.

    Link to original article
    http://www.wildhoghunters.com/conten...sors-Silencers


    Wild hog killed by Michael VanSant using a suppressed AR15 on public hunting land

    Lots of Texans regularly hunt hogs with suppressed rifles and recently the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife rescinded their regulation which prohibited their use when hunting game animals. What this means is that starting September 1st of this year, legally owned suppressors can be used when hunting all game, non-game and exotic animals in Texas.

    I've owned and hunted with suppressors as long as I've been old enough to legally purchase one, so I'm pretty well versed on their use and how to legally purchase an NFA weapon. I've got a pretty good feeling that this recent rule change is going to get a lot more people interested, so I decided to put together a little primer about suppressors and how you can legally purchase one.


    What are suppressors?

    Suppressors or more commonly referred to as "silencers" are attachments that normally attach to the muzzle of a firearm. They consist of a metal tube that contains baffles that trap the gas and unburned powder that exit the muzzle behind the bullet when a gun is fired.

    The two most significant noises created when you fire a gun are the muzzle blast and the supersonic crack of the bullet. Of the two the muzzle blast is the loudest. What a suppressor accomplishes with the baffles and expansion chambers is to catch the majority of the hot gasses, slow them and allow them to expand inside the confined space and then slowly vents them to significantly decrease the muzzle blast.

    The bullet passes through the suppressor untouched so it doesn't affect velocity or accuracy. In some cases attaching a suppressor may affect point of impact due to the weight on the end of the barrel and a change in harmonics.

    What a suppressor doesn't do is make a gun as quiet as they make them in the movies. A lot of people are less impressed with suppressors than they thought they would be when they finally hear one. A good suppressor will tone down a .223/5.56 rifle to about the sound of a .22lr. So it's still pretty loud but not near as loud as an unsuppressed one. To greatly reduce the sound you'd need to shoot subsonic ammo. A suppressed rifle shooting subsonic ammo IS almost movie quiet but you loose a lot of velocity on the bullet so in turn you decrease the effective range of your weapon. Remember, speed kills.


    Why use a suppressor for hunting?

    I think the real question is, why not use a suppressor? Firearms are inherently loud which is both bad for your hearing and can scare animals away from long distances. Most hunters don't wear hearing protection when hunting because losing the sense of hearing can be very detrimental when your out in the woods looking and listening for animals.

    Every un-muffled gun shot damages your hearing. Hearing loss has a cumulative effect, which means that you aren't going to go deaf just because of one gun shot but over time and many gun shots you cause more and more damage leading to greater hearing loss. Using a suppressor will bring most gun shot reports down to or close to hearing safe levels. That means less damage to your ears and better hearing in the future. In Europe, suppressors are practically mandatory for hunting and target shooting. You wouldn't drive your car without a muffler so why would you want to shoot your gun without one?

    The other point is that using a suppressor makes it less likely that you'll scare away near by animals. In Texas you've got a pretty good chance that you've got deer and hogs living in the same areas. With a suppressor you have the ability to shoot those pesky hogs that have been raiding your feeder without ruining the rest of your hunt so you might still have a chance at that monster buck you've been after. Also, if you're hunting hogs and you shoot one using a suppressor it's very likely that the ones that ran away might come back as we've seen this happen multiple times.


    What are the legalities of and how to buy a suppressor?

    Suppressors are considered Title II weapons under the National Firearms Act (NFA). You'll hear a lot of people call them "Class 3" but class III is actually refers to the classification of dealers who can buy and sell title II weapons such as suppressors and machine guns. Title II weapons are also commonly referred to as NFA weapons because of the National Firearms Act they are controlled under.

    Any US citizen who lives in a state that allows them can buy an NFA item providing they can pass a thorough background check in order to register the item so that you can legally possess it. That said, anyone who can legally purchase a handgun shouldn't have any problems being approved for a suppressor.

    There are multiple ways to register an NFA item including individual registration, registration to a business or corporation or registration to a trust. Today I'm going to discuss registration to an individual or a trust since this covers 99% of NFA owners out there.

    We'll start off with an individual registration.


    Buying a suppressor as an individual

    First you need to decide what suppressor you want and who you want to buy it from. Most dealers carry many different manufacturers who make suppressors of different types of construction, with different features and varying pricing structures. While we're on this subject, let me go off on a quick tangent...

    The more expensive suppressors aren't necessarily going to be quieter than the cheaper ones. If you lined up several cheaper suppressors against several more expensive suppressors most people would be hard pressed to tell the difference between the noise levels alone as the difference between most suppressors is just a few decibels at best.

    Normally what increased prices buy your are increased features, decreased size and decreased weight. For example, a budget suppressor might have all steel construction, be 10" long, weigh 1lb 8oz and attaches by threading onto standard muzzle threads. Whereas the more expensive suppressor might be constructed of steel and other exotic light weight metals like inconel, be 8" long, weigh 1lb 1oz and attaches using a quick disconnect system for quick attachment and removal.

    So don't think that a cheaper suppressor won't work as good, because it probably will, it just won't be as nice and as user friendly. Now, back on subject.....


    Now that you've decided what suppressor you want and who you're going to buy it from you need to call them up and buy it. It's usually better if you buy from a dealer in your state. NFA items can't transfer across state lines without going through a NFA dealer. So, if you buy from an out of state dealer they will then have to transfer it to a dealer in your state and then the in state dealer will have to transfer it to you and that adds in an extra transfer you'll have to wait for before you can get your suppressor in your hands.

    So you've found an in state dealer and bought your suppressor. Now it's time for some paperwork. The dealer will fill out a tax paid form 4, in duplicate, with all of his information and the information about your suppressor such as manufacturer, type, size, serial number, etc. Now that he's filled out his portions you have to fill out yours to include your name, address, etc. In addition, you will also have to attach a passport photo of yourself to the back of both copies and the chief law enforcement officer (CLEO) in your area will have to sign on the back of the forms and fill out the information about his position and where he works. If you live in the city the CLEO will be the chief of police and in the country it will be the county Sheriff. You will also need to get two fingerprint cards done.

    Wow! That's a lot of work! Well, it's not really as bad as it sounds. Now that you've got it all done there's only a couple of things left. You need to completely a Certificate of Compliance which is basically just signing your name certifying yourself as a US citizen and then you need to write out a $200 check to the BATF. At last you can stick your pile of paperwork into an envelope and mail it off.

    Now comes the worst part, the wait. Currently, as of April 2012, wait times for NFA transfers is running about 5.5-6 months. Under George Bush the wait time was as low as 34 days but the NFA office, in addition to many other things, has gone way down hill since ole George was in office.

    cont.

    •   Alt 

      WildHogHunters

      advertising
      WildHogHunters.com
      has no influence
      on advertisings
      that are displayed by
      Google Adsense

        
       

  2. #2
    Wild Hog Hunter Ponyboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    762
    Blog Entries
    3
    Buying a suppressor through a trust

    Registering NFA weapons to a trust has become very popular in the last several years and for good reason. There are several advantages to using a trust for your NFA purchases.

    A trust is a legal entity or non-natural person, much like a corporation, except that a trust is not created to engage in business, it's created to hold tangible and non-tangible property for a whole slew of reasons. For our purposes we're going to be talking about an NFA specific trust that has been created solely to own all NFA weapons that you purchase.

    Since a trust is not a natural person it's not required to have a picture affixed to the form 4 you will file to register your suppressor. A trust also does not have fingerprints so you will not be required to submit two fingerprint cards with your registration papers. And finally, since a trust can not have a criminal record there is no need for the CLEO sign off declaring that the CLEO does not have any knowledge or reason as to why the registration for the trust should not be approved. These three things along take away a lot of the hassle of registering a suppressor or other NFA weapon.

    The next thing is probably the biggest advantage to using a trust for registration. A weapon registered to a trust allows multiple individuals legal access to possess a single NFA weapon. Basically, anyone listed on the trust can have access to your suppressor. With an individual registration only the person listed on the registration paperwork can possess the NFA item that means that if you accidentally leave your suppressor in your truck and your wife drives your truck, she has committed a felony by possessing an NFA weapon that is not registered to her. However, if you create Joe Blow Family trust with all of Joe Blow's immediate family listed as members of the trust, anyone listed can legally possess and use any NFA weapon that is property owned by the trust.

    This is a huge advantage to using a trust for NFA purchases. Not only is it easier to file for registration, it allows several people to share or possess a particular item. There is not limit to the number of items that a trust can own so you could use a trust to purchase your entire collection of NFA toys. Now, this still does not override the fact that each individual must still legally be able to possess an NFA weapon. What I mean is that Uncle Lou who has prior felonies for bootlegging moonshine is still not legally eligible to own or possess any firearm or NFA weapon even if he's listed on the trust. In fact, it would be best not to list anyone not legally eligible to own a weapon on the trust at all.

    The steps for using a trust to purchase an NFA weapon is pretty much the same as an individual registration. As said before, you don't need to submit the photos, fingerprints or get the CLEO sign off, but you'll still use the same form 4 and in place of putting your name as the purchaser you'll list the legal name of the trust. You'll also need to send in a complete copy of the completed trust with the rest of the paperwork you mail to the BATF. That's it. The wait time for approval isn't decreased much, if at all, but the overall process is much simpler since you don't need to complete as many steps or involve anyone else to complete the paperwork.


    How do I create a trust?

    You will hear many different opinions on this. You can find some examples of NFA trusts on the internet that some people will just copy using their own information where it's needed. Some people have created their own trusts using Quicken Will Maker or other similar programs. Then there are several attorneys that specialize in drawing up NFA trusts for their clients.

    The fact of the matter is, the BATF has recently been cracking down on incorrectly created or improperly worded trusts. This can cause many problems if you purchase several items using the trust and then later on the BATF decides that the trust is not valid. For this reason and to avoid a lot of headache, I suggest using an attorney to create your trust that is specifically tailored to you. It may cost a little more in the beginning but I believe it's worth it for the piece of mind of knowing that your trust is legally valid and that you have a professional there to back you up if there are ever any issues. Most attorneys will also send you instructions for filling out your registration forms and answer any questions you may have so you can make sure that you fill out everything correctly. Incorrectly completed forms can cause a several week delay of your transfer being approved.

    A few last comments about suppressors

    In closing, I just want to warn you that suppressors are addictive. Once you realize how much more pleasant using a suppressor is for shooting you're going to want one for all of your guns.

    One thing you can do to help save a little money is buy a suppressor that you can use on multiple guns. Suppressors are caliber specific but you can always shoot a smaller bullet through a suppressor that is rated for a larger caliber. For example, it's become pretty common for people to purchase 7.62 caliber suppressors so that they can use them on both their .308 rifle and also on their 5.56mm rifle instead of buying another suppressor to use on their 5.56.

    Since a 5.56 bullet won't seal the gasses as well in a 7.62 caliber suppressor as well as a 7.62 caliber bullet would it's going to be just slightly louder than it would be if you used the correct size 5.56 caliber suppressor. However, the difference is so minute that you probably won't be able to tell without measuring with a sound meter. Just make sure that you don't accidentally mount a 5.56 caliber suppressor on a 7.62 caliber weapon. It's not pretty when you try to shoot a larger bullet through a smaller hole.

    So get out there and see what the world of suppressors have to offer you. If you want to go see what's available we recommend you check out our buddy Dave's store at http://www.silencershop.com. Dave is the official suppressor supplier of WildHogHunters.com. He has some of the best prices out there and he's a hell of a nice guy. If you talk to him let him know we sent ya and he'll take extra special care of you.

    It's kinda long but there was a lot of information I had to cram in there

  3. #3
    Member lmc8541's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Bedford, transplant from East Texas.
    Posts
    81
    Good post, Mike. still waiting for mine!

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    7
    good post. A few friends are waiting on theirs as well.
    If you don't play the wind you don't get the kill

  5. #5
    Wild Hog Hunter
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Splendora, TX
    Posts
    588
    Thanks for the info

  6. #6
    Wild Hog Hunter Ponyboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    762
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by lmc8541 View Post
    Good post, Mike. still waiting for mine!

    We've got three more that we're waiting on right now. I'm guessing we'll probably get them sometime in July.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Eastex Shooting Supply